Consumer responses to the development of the 'Recycle Now' brand and messaging hierarchy

Client:
Corporate Culture
Start date:
February 2007
Completed:
May 2007

Objectives
This project saw Brook Lyndhurst working as subcontractors to design consultancy Corporate Culture, which had been appointed by the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) to explore consumer responses to the Recycle Now brand. The research was driven by two overlapping factors.

Firstly, as recycling has become higher profile, pack labels are beginning to display a combination of 'action' messages (calling upon consumers to dispose of their packaging in a particular way) and 'information' messages (telling consumers that their pack has been made in a particular way - e.g. from recycled material). The similarity of these labels creates scope for confusion.

Secondly, as policy focus shifts from recycling to waste prevention more generally, there was a desire to explore the possible use of the Recycle Now 'swoosh' icon as a vehicle for other messages - e.g. 'reuse', 'reduce', 'refill' or 'compost'.

Methodology
We ran a programme of six focus groups in six different locations. These presented participants with a range of iconography options developed by Corporate Culture, exploring areas of confusion and inferences drawn.

Findings
Not published.

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