Monthly Archives: September 2014

Energy efficiency: behaviour, rationality, economics and politics

I had the pleasure of joining some 300 researchers and academics from around the world a couple of weeks ago to discuss the latest thinking on persuading consumers to use less energy.  The BEHAVE2014 conference took place in Oxford at a time when it is increasingly appreciated, by businesses, governments and civic society, that any [...]

Herd behaviour amongst sports fans

We had a conversation in the office the other day about herd behaviour and the difference between football and cricket crowds. Why is it that spectators at a football match can occasionally get aggressive and abusive, but spectators at a cricket match tend to act more like naughty schoolboys: boisterous but essentially good-natured? It’s a [...]

Just can’t get enough? (BEHAVE 2014 Blog Series, 4/4)

Ten years ago, Brook Lyndhurst commissioned MORI to survey a representative sample of 1,000 adults.  One of the things we asked back then was: “To what extent do you think it would fair or unfair for the government to charge a lower rate of VAT on energy efficient products and a higher rate of VAT [...]

Extending product lifetimes (BEHAVE 2014 Blog Series, 3/4)

More sustainable consumption is likely to mean ‘buying less stuff’ – or, more specifically, acquiring fewer products that deplete finite material resources. If people are to maintain their lifestyles, this will mean changes such as renting goods rather than buying them, and buying second-hand or reconditioned goods rather than new ones. Our recent survey* results [...]

Hard choices (BEHAVE 2014 Blog Series, 2/4)

This blog is the second in our series of blogs in the lead up to the 2014 BEHAVE conference. Like the first blog, we’re delving into some of the results of a survey we ran a few months ago that gauged consumer attitudes towards a range of environmental and lifestyle issues. In our survey we asked: ‘How often [...]