Author Archives: Geoff King

Extending product lifetimes (BEHAVE 2014 Blog Series, 3/4)

More sustainable consumption is likely to mean ‘buying less stuff’ – or, more specifically, acquiring fewer products that deplete finite material resources. If people are to maintain their lifestyles, this will mean changes such as renting goods rather than buying them, and buying second-hand or reconditioned goods rather than new ones. Our recent survey* results [...]

Hard choices (BEHAVE 2014 Blog Series, 2/4)

This blog is the second in our series of blogs in the lead up to the 2014 BEHAVE conference. Like the first blog, we’re delving into some of the results of a survey we ran a few months ago that gauged consumer attitudes towards a range of environmental and lifestyle issues. In our survey we asked: ‘How often [...]

Food waste in restaurants: out of home, out of mind?

This blog was originally written by Brook Lyndhurst for The Guardian Sustainable Business portal. It can be found in its original location here: http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/food-waste-eating-out-restaurants In a recent survey most people identified chips as the food they left uneaten and many saw salad garnishes as purely ornamental Photograph: Alamy Q. How many people leave food at the end [...]

Shifting energy cultures

I’ve just come back from researching energy in New Zealand. It turns out there are some pretty fundamental differences in the production and consumption of energy between the UK and  New Zealand. Below are a few examples and accompanying observations and anecdotes regarding possible reasons why this might be the case. At the end I’ll [...]

Energy cultures: re-thinking how we evaluate behaviour change?

Drawing distinctions between ‘change in attitude’, ‘change in behaviour’ and ‘one-off material change’ may miss out important pieces of the overall picture. The Energy Cultures team at CSAFE, have developed an ‘Energy Cultures Framework’. This framework brings together Cognitive norms (including attitudes), Practices (behaviour) and Material Culture, and suggests that these elements can all be interlinked and reinforce one another…